How to generate warm leads from networking events

Hey, do you want to generate a ton of warm leads from networking events?  In this video, I’m going to share my top tips on how to generate business from networking events.

Video Transcript

Hey, do you want to generate a ton of warm leads from networking events?

In this video, I’m going to share my top tips on how to generate business from networking events. Now, to preface this video, over the last 10 years, I’ve been to well have a thousand events and generated, hundreds of thousands of dollar business in networking events. What I’m going to share the comes from my mistakes and lessons, so number one is to make sure you select the right kind of networking events. What do I mean by the right kind of events? Select the kind of events whereby you’re likely to find your target audience or potential strategic partners. What I mean is people that you could potentially collaborate with or do things together with that may or may not be potential clients, so now that you’ve identified the right kind of events, you can go a step farther and try and try and understand who is actually going to be coming through those events.

If you go to, if you find events through websites like meetup.com, most likely you’re going to find a list of attendance here. You can also ask your event organizer, who are you expecting to come to those events because once you understand who is coming to those events, it will help you be more prepared so you can be able to get the most out of these events. Now that you’ve found good events, you probably understand who is coming to those events. The next thing is what do you do when you get the events? Number one being is to make sure you’ve got your pitch dialled in what are you? How are you going to introduce yourself and how you’re going to be able to share with people exactly what you do. I’ve practised all forms of pitches and one of the ones that are found to be the most effective is a pitch that goes along the lines of this.

You know, how you know how then [insert the name of the problems with my clients are facing], well I do these and then you in such a solution so that you can have this outcome. So a good example is how I introduce myself and I’ll say, you know, how most small businesses struggle to generate leads. And sales for their business, while I help small business owners put together a system to generate a consistent supply of leads so that they can be able to serve their clients and do what they love without having to worry about where the next client is going to come from. It’s a very simple way of introducing yourself. It says exactly what you do in. It also gives them the context in a way that mix and goes, ah, that’s what you do when you start having a conversation with people.

If you find that people do not get what you do or you find that this conversation is not going anywhere, or this person is just in it for themselves, it’s ok to politely excuse yourself and move on. The other thing I always remembered how to remember when you go to events is what I call the mindset of a good networker. Remember your there in a networking event for a number of things. Number one, you provide value to actually connect with other human beings and provide value to them. This could be by asking, uh, providing ideas of how they can do their business better or how they can improve their solution. The next mindset is to think about every single person can potentially be a client, strategic partner or a door opener. So go there with a mindset that if you they are not a potential client, what can we potentially do together?

The other mindset is to go to networking events on behalf of your clients. So when I go there to the networking event, I’ll be thinking, right, what does this person do and how can I link them with that with my client or with a friend or with another person? If you go to a networking and you get to be seen as a connector: that person, the hub, the person who connects other people together. People will become naturally drawn to you because they know that you’re the connector. You’re the one who connects people together, so your networking on your own behalf, your networking on behalf of others, and looking for ways to connect people with people so that you become the hub. People come to you for connections. Right? So try that. Next time we go to networking events. The other thing is too, once you go to a networking, the other thing is once you’ve connected with someone and you feel there’s potential value, the next thing is to follow up.

There are different ways to follow up. You can give them a call, you can drop them an email saying, hey, it was good to meet you. Would you mind for us to take this conversation further and discuss what we, what we talked about? Right. So follow up. I’ve also got an automated followup, so every time I go to a networking event and scan someone’s business card, they automatically get an email saying it’s a  pleasure to meet you. So it’s all a little way to be more consistent and more to make sure that I always follow up, but the best way to follow up, it’s just by email. Send them a quick followup saying thank you so much for catching up or meeting you on this networking event, blah blah, blah, blah, blah.

This is what we talked about and this is where we can take this conversation further. So there you have it. When you go to a networking event, always think about how you can add value to other people, not necessarily what you can get from other people and you find that people will be more drawn to you. The problem with most networking events is, and a lot of people are there to sell, to shove business cards and try and collect cards so that they can go and add you in their database without permission. So don’t be that guy. Okay? So here you have it and I hope you enjoy these trips and go out in rock networking events.

Posted in ,

John Kiama

I help established coaches, speakers and professional service businesses to generate unlimited high-value clients and growth.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.